Dash removal

Drive motor and electrical issues

Dash removal

Postby jdunmyer » Mon Mar 30, 2015 11:11 pm

Today, we finished stripping the E12 that I got with a pile of junk, er "salvage", removing the entire steering mechanism. It needs to be transplanted into the E15 that I'm selling.

Anyway, in working on this thing, it occurred to me that it's impossible to get to the rear of the dash, say, to replace a switch. How does one go about that? If I had to guess, it looks like you remove the steering wheel, remove the dash screws, unplug the big Molex connector, then slide the dash up the steering shaft. Is it really that complicated? Or do you have to remove the steering shaft also?

How do you remove the steering wheel if it's a bit stuck? The E12 had sat outside for a while and things were rusted, so we ended up cutting a big ol' slot in the dash casting so we could get the wheel & shaft assembly out and over to the hydraulic press. Obviously, that's not the way to do things on something you want to save.
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Re: Dash removal

Postby roberttroll » Tue Mar 31, 2015 2:03 am

Unfortunately, most of the time you have to cut the steering shaft off to remove the wheel.
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Re: Dash removal

Postby FarmallMan » Tue Mar 31, 2015 3:31 am

There are two types of dashboard designs. The original type had just a decal sticker on casting where the gauges and the speed controller go, and the switches attached to a piece of sheet steel that screwed into place. The later types (or earlier ones that had the "appearance package" applied) had a plastic dashboard that went over both the bottom and top. The correct way to remove this is to remove the steering shaft and meters, otherwise you risk cracking the plastic.

As already mentioned, most of the time the only way to extract the steering shaft is to cut it and bring it to the press. Some folks weld them back together. I have milled flats in both sides of the shaft and used set screw shaft couplers in the past. By doing so, it's easy to remove the shaft again down the road, if need be.

Nick 8-)
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Re: Dash removal

Postby jdunmyer » Tue Mar 31, 2015 12:04 pm

The E12 had the plastic dash, as does both the E15 and E16 that I bought. Hard to believe that they designed things to make it so difficult to service. The E15 that I have has had a PTO switch added to the dash, it's a momentary 2-position operation. That's in addition to the 3-position stock switch. Besides being unsure as to its exact function, I'm impressed that someone went to that much trouble.

The thought of a coupling crossed my mind, I'm glad to hear that it's a viable approach.
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Re: Dash removal

Postby FarmallMan » Tue Mar 31, 2015 1:56 pm

I suppose, after thinking about it, the steering shaft would not have to be removed, but the steering wheel would. The issue is that the clearance on the bore of the steering wheel is too tight. If allowed to rust from moisture exposure (or sometimes just time is all that's required) they tend to seize or at lease severely bind on the shafts. When I get them off, I tend to polish the shaft and the bore of the steering wheel to ease assembly and future disassembly.

FWIW, the plastic dash was added in later models to improve appearance. So unfortunately, serviceability suffered for the sake of appearance. The good news is that the switches then to be very robust.

Could the other switch be a second lift switch for possibly a rear lift?

Nick 8-)
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Re: Dash removal

Postby Steve Duke » Tue Mar 31, 2015 10:47 pm

I have successfully used the " Harold Zimmerman " method a couple of times, to remove a steering wheel from the shaft. First, soak the hell out of the shaft where it meets the center of the steering wheel, with your favorite penetrant - I like Kriol - and let sit overnight. Next remove the pin holding the wheel onto the shaft; then remove the lower dash panel cover. Take a large pipe wrench, and grab onto the shaft. While holding the pipe wrench handle against the dash housing, twist the wheel until it's loose. ( bring your muscles ! ) :-)
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Re: Dash removal

Postby jdunmyer » Tue Mar 31, 2015 11:49 pm

Today, I happened to think of my OTC bearing puller. see this page: http://www.otctools.com/search?search_a ... ltext=1123 I have the #1123 and #927, and I'd almost bet that the combination would pull the wheel. Maybe not if it's very rusty; that E12 wheel endured a lot of hammering, even with a muffler gun, and it didn't come loose. We cut the dash to get it out, then used the big hydraulic press, but the press didn't strain at all.

Will try to remember the Harold Zimmerman method. :-)
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